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Purcell has been the commissioned architect for all work at Knole for over twenty years, and a continuous programme of repair and conservation work has been in progress since the mid-1990s. Various parts of the house have been re-roofed and major repair projects have been undertaken in the Orangery and Long Gallery.

The earliest parts of the house at Knole date from around 1456, with the second major building phase carried out by the Sackvilles completed in 1605. Since 1946, the building has belonged to the National Trust. 

In addition to working for the National Trust, Purcell also carried out a significant programme of works to the private apartments, encompassing 52 rooms and 3 external courtyards.  Work included the conservation, repair and reordering of the interiors, in addition to a new build extension and the re-presentation of a medieval roof space and historic Water Court. 

The house has been largely re-wired, with conservation heating added to the display rooms. Comprehensive fire detection and compartmentation works, alarm and lightning conductor systems have also been installed. 

A new staircase was designed to sit sympathetically within the traditionally panelled interior.

Knole retains the scale of a royal palace and is still occupied by separate households, with an impressive suite of rooms open to the public.

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